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Thread: Hi-ils

  1. #1
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    Hi-ils

    I must have missed this somewhere. What's a HI-ILS?

    Wes

  2. #2
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    High Altitude Instrument Procedure -

    Did a google search out on the internet and ended up right here!

    HI-ILS Thread

  3. #3
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    Do we have any military flyers around these parts?

    My recollection is that a HI-ILS is a military thing, and that it's what it sounds like, a high ILS, i.e. an ILS whose glideslope continues up to much higher altitudes than a regular ILS.

    I don't think our usual civilian literature (e.g. the FAA pubs, the AIM) say much about them because civilians don't really encounter them much.

    This is all going on memory, so it's worth what you paid for it.
    -harry

  4. #4
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    I'm flying the Columbia down to Montgomery AL today for a family reunion tomorrow. KMGM has a couple of HI-ILS approaches and I just had never seen one before. Maxwell AFB is pretty close - maybe they use them to let down from higher alt. ??

    The approach plate has barber poles across the top and bottom of it like "Beware!" But I don't see anything on the plate that says I'm not authorized to fly it.

    There's some weather down there this afternoon at about our arrival time so just dottin' all the i's.

    Wes

  5. #5
    bravodelta79 Guest
    I see to remember them being for military too. If there isn't anything in the FAR's that say you can't fly it, why couldn't you?

    Wes - Can you provide a tail number so we can track you?

  6. #6
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    KMGM has a couple of HI-ILS approaches...
    I always thought a HI-ILS actually had you on the localizer/glideslope when descending from your HI altitude, but on these approaches the big descent is just in the initial leg of the approach, tracking a VOR radial inbound. Once you're actually on the localizer, it's pretty much identical to the "civilian" ILS approach.
    -harry

  7. #7
    Crism Guest
    If you're not afraid of shock cooling, climb to 10000ft, pull the power, nose it over, and fly the HI-ILS

  8. #8
    jfitzpat Guest
    FWIW, "HI-" is a new, standardized prefix for instrument procedures (approach or departure) that typically either begin or end at/above FL180.

    The current TERPS (see 8260.xx) docs cover them. They were developed at the request of the USAF, basically to standardize the DOD 'FLIPs' stuff.

    -jjf

  9. #9
    Soybean Guest
    Originally posted by jfitzpat
    FWIW, "HI-" is a new, standardized prefix for instrument procedures (approach or departure) that typically either begin or end at/above FL180.
    That's the key right there. The procedures start at or above FL180, meaning it's got an IAF up at those altitudes, generally. I think they were originally developed for fighters that flew like bricks with the power off, but I could be wrong.

    And I don't know how "new" they are, I've know about them for at least 10 years or so. Civilian pilots usually don't even see them, since they're not published in the civilian IAPs.

  10. #10
    jfitzpat Guest
    Originally posted by Soybean
    That's the key right there. The procedures start at or above FL180, meaning it's got an IAF up at those altitudes, generally. I think they were originally developed for fighters that flew like bricks with the power off, but I could be wrong.

    And I don't know how "new" they are, I've know about them for at least 10 years or so. Civilian pilots usually don't even see them, since they're not published in the civilian IAPs.
    The designator ("HI-") is new. FLIPs books and AF charts are not.

    The point of standardizing military procedures into SIAPs is overall safety.

    -jjf

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by ohiopilot
    I see to remember them being for military too. If there isn't anything in the FAR's that say you can't fly it, why couldn't you?

    Wes - Can you provide a tail number so we can track you?
    Thanks for the pointers. When I got down here Friday I got the ILS 28 approach but broke out at 3000', kicked off the autopilot and landed off a visual.

    The aircraft I'm flying is my Columbia 400, N2730P. With Gracie and Dawn onboard, I stayed lower and came down at 10,000' non-stop, FME - MGM in 3:45 whooping the Delta airlines time by more than a couple of hours and more than a couple of hundred dollars (for all those that say you can't make economical use of a plane). Burning 17 g/h and 191kts true it was a quiet cabin (31"/2400rpm) - (Gracie won't keep a headset on) and we had over an hour of fuel left in the tank when we landed.

    We'll probably leave mid-morning tomorrow to fly back home.

    Wes

  12. #12
    HIGHwing Guest
    Originally posted by WesJones
    Burning 17 g/h and 191kts true it was a quiet cabin...

    Wes
    I can hit the 191true, but the 17gph I can't compete with, that's really amazing. You're running LOP as a standard operation in the '400 though right? My MEI was talking about the 400, he went to Oregon to be one of those Certified Columbia Instructors and we were chatting about it recently.

    Oh, and have a safe flight.

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by HIGHwing
    I can hit the 191true, but the 17gph I can't compete with, that's really amazing. You're running LOP as a standard operation in the '400 though right? My MEI was talking about the 400, he went to Oregon to be one of those Certified Columbia Instructors and we were chatting about it recently.
    Got back in to FME about 3:30pm today - 3:36 elapsed time Montgomery to Tipton. We had a head wind most of the way until the NC/VA border where we finally picked up a 10 kt tailwind. Headwind both ways but it was light so no complaints.

    I pretty much only run my Columbia LOP and not just a little bit. I've got the Platinum Cont. engine and it's been a good one. For the trip back I stepped on it a little bit more - 32", 2500rpm, about 17.8 - 18 g/h which at 9000 was 193 kts and at 11000 for the last third of trip I got 198 true on the same power setting. To run it ROP responsibly, you have to put about 23 - 24 g/h through it but I wanted to go non-stop again and it would have been close ROP. I landed with about 28 gal. on board or way short of adequate reserves if I'd really stepped on it.

    Wes


 

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