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  1. #1
    asteroid Guest

    Sport Pilot vs Private Pilot !

    Reading in the last weeks, I understood (I hope) the difference between the two ! However, the minimum training required for SP is 20 hours and the minimum for PP is 40 hours ! Now, Sport or Private, you need the ability to fly the that airplane in any circumstances. What is the difference between Sport and Private ? (except range, airplane weight and air class). I guess I am reffering more as a airplane maneuvres.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Think of the difference between sport and private as the difference between a motorcycle and a driver's license. One is mainly meant for good-weather riding for personal transportation or fun, while the other will let you haul the entire soccer team, or a U-Haul truck with a trailer, through a pounding rainstorm in a traffic jam.

    With sport pilot, you can only take yourself or one other passenger, during the day, with 3 miles visibility or better, up to 10,000 MSL (with exceptions in mountainous areas), and need extra training and signoffs to fly into towered and busy airspace.

    With private pilot, you can to fly a turbocharged 8-passenger monster at 250 knots at night, into Chicago O'Hare. (A few extra bits of training and signoffs needed for that turbocharged monster, but not the 8-seat or the O'Hare part.)

    They're functionally identical on the short hop down to the grocery store for milk and bread, but there's a lot more training on night flying, handling radios and flying in controlled airspace, and more on recovery from unusual attitudes / flight into clouds for the private pilot.

    check out here: http://www.sportpilot.org/interest/p...mitations.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Dot, I'm gonna steal that!

  4. #4
    kcabpilot Guest
    Here's the only real potential problem you might have to be concerned with in regards to a Sport Pilot rating: If you were training with a sport pilot rated instructor and you later want to continue on to a private pilot rating do those hours invested count?

    I don't know the answer, maybe someone else here does?

  5. #5
    EppyGA Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by kcabpilot View Post
    Here's the only real potential problem you might have to be concerned with in regards to a Sport Pilot rating: If you were training with a sport pilot rated instructor and you later want to continue on to a private pilot rating do those hours invested count?

    I don't know the answer, maybe someone else here does?
    Unfortunately they don't. Apparently a Sport Pilot instructor must not teach those things as well as a CFI.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcabpilot View Post
    Here's the only real potential problem you might have to be concerned with in regards to a Sport Pilot rating: If you were training with a sport pilot rated instructor and you later want to continue on to a private pilot rating do those hours invested count?

    I don't know the answer, maybe someone else here does?
    About a year ago, I got into quite a discussion with dmspilot regarding this. At the time, the general consensus was that the time counted. This was the opinion promulgated by anyone and everyone in the FAA and the alphabet soup groups. It was also part of the intent of the rating - let people come in at that level and move up, if desired.

    About April or May last year there were rumblings and some articles that contradicted this. At the same time, the folks at AFS600 (if I recall the division correctly) told me directly that they couldn't confirm it, but something was coming from FAA Legal on the subject. Then, during Oshkosh week, the legal counsel put it out: training from a subpart K instructor does not count towards the private certificate, as it all hinges around the word "authorized". It does, though, if the instruction was provided by a subpart H instructor.

    The interesting thing, though, is that solo time is solo time that all counts, with perhaps the exception of the approved cross-countries. I don't recall, but I think those fall into the "authorized instructor" trap. Since the distance requirements are different, anyway, I'd send them off xc's, anyway.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    X39 Tampa Florida
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    Smile

    Dot, you have such a great way of explaining things! Thank you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    San Diego
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    The stick and rudder skills are the same. Basically just subtract night, instrument, VOR Nav, and a long cross country from the training requirements. If you make sure you use a regular CFI (as opposed to sport pilot instructor) all of your time will count towards private and higher certs. The cross country minimums are different, but if you stick to the private pilot standards they will count as well. If you train at a towered field, you can get the Class B endorsement. At this point you can stop training and enjoy flying a buddy up for a hamburger somewhere, or some local trips. If you decide you want the private cert, you just have to complete the additional requirement. I have a sport cert, and can answer any questions.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike92104 View Post
    The stick and rudder skills are the same. Basically just subtract night, instrument, VOR Nav, and a long cross country from the training requirements. If you make sure you use a regular CFI (as opposed to sport pilot instructor) all of your time will count towards private and higher certs. The cross country minimums are different, but if you stick to the private pilot standards they will count as well. If you train at a towered field, you can get the Class B endorsement. At this point you can stop training and enjoy flying a buddy up for a hamburger somewhere, or some local trips. If you decide you want the private cert, you just have to complete the additional requirement. I have a sport cert, and can answer any questions.
    Any questions? Dang!

  10. #10
    skunker Guest
    Hey guys, with the new sport pilot rules in affect April 2010, I believe all sport pilot training time counts towards a PPL.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunker View Post
    Hey guys, with the new sport pilot rules in affect April 2010, I believe all sport pilot training time counts towards a PPL.
    I'll make some calls and double check. I hope I'm wrong, but I think we're still hung up on the "Authorized Instructor" clause for private pilot and above, if I remember what I read correctly.

  12. #12
    mcjon77 Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by skunker View Post
    Hey guys, with the new sport pilot rules in affect April 2010, I believe all sport pilot training time counts towards a PPL.
    Unfortunately, the new rule did not address this.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by skunker View Post
    Hey guys, with the new sport pilot rules in affect April 2010, I believe all sport pilot training time counts towards a PPL.
    Reference? Please.

  14. #14
    asteroid Guest
    And a question : one is to drive a Chevy Suburban (big and strong car, or any in this class) other is to drive a ... say Camry and other to drive Accent or small car ! (where you can here and feel any noise, wind, vibration ....) Is this the case between LSA planes and PPL planes !?

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by asteroid View Post
    And a question : one is to drive a Chevy Suburban (big and strong car, or any in this class) other is to drive a ... say Camry and other to drive Accent or small car ! (where you can here and feel any noise, wind, vibration ....) Is this the case between LSA planes and PPL planes !?
    Noise is different from plane to plane. You're right that you feel the wind and the turbulence more in a lighter aircraft.


 

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