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  • Hello

    Hi i am Horacio Warren i have a question about air taxi service. I am a commercial pilot and i want to start Air Taxi services so can i started this service.

  • #2
    An air taxi service requires much more than just being a commercial pilot. There are a lot of details which appear in Part 135 of the FARs, but here are some of the requirements to obtain a 135 certificate of operation:
    • Airplane or airplanes leased or owned, suitable for the proposed service.
    • Pilot or pilots who have at least a commercial pilot certificate with instrument rating, who qualify by having both the required number of hours and pass an air taxi checkride with an FAA Inspector.
    • A designated maintenance facility approved by the FAA.
    • An operations plan/handbook meeting FAA requirements.

    Once the air taxi certificate has been issued, the requirements continue; here are some of them:
    • Each air taxi pilot must be IFR current, but single pilot air taxi service does not allow IFR (neither filing in VFR conditions nor actual), except with a further and more detailed air taxi checkride in an airplane with a fully serviceable 2 axis autopilot.
    • Each air taxi pilot must pass the same air taxi checkride every 12 months according to the regs, unless the FAA decides to make it more often. When I was flying air taxi, we had to do the ride every 6 months--I don't know the reason our particular operation had that requirement.
    • Each airplane must have a full 100 hour inspection.

    I applaud anyone who can jump through all the necessary hoops to become a 135 operation, can continue to do it, and who is financially successful. It's a tough business.

    Cary

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    • #3
      Originally posted by HoracioWarren View Post
      Hi i am Horacio Warren i have a question about air taxi service. I am a commercial pilot and i want to start Air Taxi services so can i started this service.
      In addition to Part 135, you need to read and comply with Part 119. As Cary says, getting an Air Taxi and Commercial Operator certificate is a long and expensive process. There are companies who wade through the paperwork for you, but they don't come cheap. https://www.nbaa.org/ops/part135/certification/

      Bob Gardner

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Cary View Post
        Each air taxi pilot must pass the same air taxi checkride every 12 months according to the regs, unless the FAA decides to make it more often. When I was flying air taxi, we had to do the ride every 6 months--I don't know the reason our particular operation had that requirement.
        Try reading FAR 135.297.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jimmy View Post
          Try reading FAR 135.297.
          That is inapplicable. Most of us were operating VFR only, without an autopilot, so only 135.293 applied to most of us. Only our chief pilot regularly took the IFR proficiency rides described in 135.297. Of course, as required elsewhere, we were all required to be IFR current anyway. I was just a cog in the wheel, so as I said, why we took 6 month checkrides instead of 12 month checkrides, I haven't any idea.

          Cary

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cary View Post
            I haven't any idea.

            Cary
            Did the idea of asking ever cross your mind?

            Jimmy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jimmy View Post
              Did the idea of asking ever cross your mind?

              Jimmy
              No.

              Cary

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              • #8
                Is it common for pilots to take check rides without knowing why they are taking the checks?

                Who here has taken a check ride without knowning why they were taking the check ride or what they were to be tested on? Were you in a professional pilot setting at the time or something else? When you got to the end of your check ride, assuming that you passed and the person giving you the check told you that you passed, did they ever tell you what it was you had just passed?

                Thanks,

                Jimmy

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jimmy View Post
                  Is it common for pilots to take check rides without knowing why they are taking the checks?

                  Who here has taken a check ride without knowning why they were taking the check ride or what they were to be tested on? Were you in a professional pilot setting at the time or something else? When you got to the end of your check ride, assuming that you passed and the person giving you the check told you that you passed, did they ever tell you what it was you had just passed?

                  Thanks,

                  Jimmy
                  If you're addressing why I didn't know the reasons for the 6 month rides, I can tell you what I was told. It was typically something like, "The FAA will be here on Tuesday for our ATCO checkrides. Will that work for your schedule?" Since I was a part-time employee while running my office full time, that had to be considered. As it happened, I was always able to adjust my schedule, so I never questioned it, or why it was more often than the regs required. All the charter pilots there took them the same day, typically.

                  Unlike checkrides for private, commercial, and IR, which are supposed to include specific tested items, the content of ATCO checkrides was and is pretty much left to the discretion of the examining Inspector by regulation, and they varied from one Inspector to the next and one checkride to the next. I never felt particularly pressured by the checkrides, which to the best of my recollection, I always flew in 182s, an airplane in which I was and am completely comfortable flying. Although the debriefing might include some comments about specific items, I don't recall any of them being particularly detailed.

                  But all that was a long time ago--the second FBO I worked for went out of business in 1991, so I'd guess it's been close to 30 years since I last flew a charter. It's hard enough to remember what I had for breakfast yesterday, let alone details of things that happened 30 or 40 years ago!

                  Cary

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cary View Post
                    It was typically something like, "The FAA will be here on Tuesday for our ATCO checkrides. Will that work for your schedule?" Since I was a part-time employee while running my office full time, that had to be considered. As it happened, I was always able to adjust my schedule, so I never questioned it, or why it was more often than the regs required. All the charter pilots there took them the same day, typically.
                    When your schedule didn't allow you to take the checkride, what happened? Were you allowed to continue flying as before or did something change?

                    Jimmy

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jimmy View Post
                      When your schedule didn't allow you to take the checkride, what happened? Were you allowed to continue flying as before or did something change?

                      Jimmy
                      Reread what I said that you quoted: "As it happened, I was always able to adjust my schedule...."

                      Cary

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                      • #12
                        In one way it was a good thing your business wasn't very much in demand so you could adjust your schedule. On the other hand it's kind of a shame since you'll never know why you were taking a check ride. However, I've asked if anyone here has ever taken a check ride and not know why they were taking it and it seems like you're the only one. I've asked that same questiong of a lot of pilots and some of them have even laughed. So, I don't know, maybe you hold some kind of world's record as the only person to take a check ride and not know why.

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                        • #13
                          Objection. Asked and answered.

                          Cary

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