Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 13 – Cockpit Lighting

Cockpit lighting has been the subject of considerable discussion. In military aviation, red lighting was long used in the cockpit and pilots were required to wear red goggles for a certain period of time before night flight. These precautions for night adaptation were necessary because pilots who needed to spot enemy aircraft frequently flew from … Continue reading Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 13 – Cockpit Lighting

Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 11 – Vision

Vision, even under instrument conditions, is perhaps your single most vital faculty in flying. Yet, the best eyes in the world-with 20/20 sight, good depth perception, and well-developed color vision-can play unexpected tricks on the most experienced pilot. The eyes and brain cooperate closely to produce the sensation of sight. Illusions can arise from the … Continue reading Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 11 – Vision

Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 09 – Drugs and Flying

The word "drug" evokes an image in the minds of many people far different from its actual medical meaning. Because of current concern over drug abuse, the term "drug" is often interpreted to mean marijuana, heroin, LSD, barbiturates, or amphetamines. Actually, a drug is any chemical compound administered to produce a specific effect on the … Continue reading Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 09 – Drugs and Flying

Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 08 – Alcohol

Everyone knows that alcohol impairs the efficiency of the human mechanism. This fact has been emphasized again and again-in newspapers, magazines, television, and other media throughout the world. Studies have positively proved that drinking and performance deterioration are closely linked. Estimates indicate that alcohol is a major factor in nearly 50% of all automobile accidents. … Continue reading Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 08 – Alcohol

Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 05 – Hyperventilation

Some people believe that breathing faster and deeper at high altitudes can compensate for oxygen lack. This is only partially true. Such abnormal breathing, known as hyperventilation, also causes you to flush from your lungs and blood much of the carbon dioxide your system needs to maintain the proper degree of blood acidity. The chemical … Continue reading Medical Handbook For Pilots Chapter 05 – Hyperventilation